Dbq Essay Scientific Revolution People

Ap European History Dbq: Women In The Scientific Revolution

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Scientific Revolution, which was the development of new sciences and technology, and The Age of Enlightenment, which was the so called "age of reason", had sparked women's participation in sciences. Ever since Europe was moving towards the modern world, women had been trying to change their social status from regular housework and staying at home to getting better jobs such as teaching and learning science. Although this was a great change for women, there were changing attitudes and views toward them when they had participated in science. Dorothea Erxleben, a German M.D. had appreciated that she learned science, but other people, such as men felt that they she and along with other women are taking away man's superiority role in society. There were defiantly both pros and cons towards women's participation in science. (Document 9)

The Scientific Revolution and The Age of Enlightenment paved the brink of women's success in science. Technologies such as the sextant, which was a tool used for calculating the altitude of objects and the telescope gave women the chance to study astronomy, which was the most popular subject during that time. Women would work rigorously not on housework, but on astronomy. They would advance their knowledge further with the studies of insects and the art of drawing. This would help them understand why the sun changes during the day and the different types of changes insects go through in life. Gottfried Kirch, who was a German astronomer and was the husband of Maria Winkelmann, had agreed with what women have done in the research of science. His wife discovered a comet and he was surprised because she stayed up all night and had the courage to search the skies for stars and comets. The "age of reason" helped women progress their studies because philosophers such as Rene Descartes helped them conduct experiments in an efficient way for studying by providing the Discourse on Method (1637). It gave women the ability to conduct experiments to prove difficult ideas and give them a broader knowledge of science. This was positive for women, but with there lack of family time and basic housework led to a lot of tension. (Documents 4, 5, 6)

When women have spent most of the time on science, men would be unhappy with their actions. Men would criticized them by saying how they have concentrated more on stars in the night instead of household work or how women have a weak mind and they should not study science because they would not understand it easily. They had felt that women, when first born were giving specific rules in society, which were to be inferior to men, stay home, clean the house and to take care of the children....

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Role of Women in the Scientific Revolution

1891 words - 8 pages Maria Sibylla Merian was an early biologist. She was the daughter of Matthäus Merian, a Swiss artist and publisher. Matthäus died when Maria was three, and her mother remarried Jacob Marrel, a painter, who taught and encouraged Maria in the arts. As a child, she loved to go with her stepfather to collect wildflowers and insects, but unlike her stepfather, Maria also liked to study the specimens. She published her first book of drawings of...

Women in European History Essay

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How reform movements in the 1800s sought to expand democratic ideals (AP US History DBQ)

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Ap AMerican history 1999 DBQ

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Breakthroughs in The Scientific Revolution

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1959 words - 8 pages Understanding the Scientific Revolution The Scientific Revolution was a time of change and new thinking. Many innovators had new ideas about the earth and many other things, but most challenged the Church in thinking of these new concepts. This revolution was so important to the development of mankind that modern historians honor the phrase with initial capital letters. This change of thought took almost two centuries to become established in...

The Scientific Revolution

1282 words - 5 pages In the centuries preceding the Scientific Revolution people attempted to understand natural phenomena through the lenses of doctrine and philosophical speculation. Scientists were content with to rely on a synthesis of Aristotelian framework and dogma in attempt to describe the world. During the Scientific Revolution scientists began to embrace empiricism as a way to better understand the intricacies of nature. Unlike today scientists during...

The Scientific Revolution

1440 words - 6 pages The Scientific Revolution was born between the 16th and 17th century. This paved the way for the advancement of knowledge throughout the years in all areas of scientific endeavor. On the other hand, in the 1950’s a revolution broke out which contributed in progresses in human sciences. Due to these improvements, the human race began to value scientific theories. Theories are quite difficult to demonstrate that they are true beyond a reasonable...

The Scientific Revolution

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Enlightenment Dbq Essay

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were also known as the enlightenment or the age of reason because of its new ideas and innovations. Europe experienced a series of the drastic changes and revolutions. This altered the way people lived and their standards of living. The people responsible for this were known as the philosophes. They questioned the world and suggested answers to many problems. Notable philosophes include John Locke, Voltaire, Adam Smith, and Mary Wollstonecraft along with many others. The Enlightenment philosophes worked to advance society and improve life for people. Although many philosophes worked to improve the conditions of the people, they sought to do this by different means. John Locke worked to stabilize the political aspects of Europe.
John Locke, an English philosophe, like many other philosophes of his time worked to improve society by advocating for the individual rights of people. John Locke strongly believed in more rights for the people and was against oppression. In his book, Second Treatise on Civil Government, Locke stated, “(W)e must consider, what state all men are naturally in, and that is, a state of perfect freedom to order their actions, and dispose [manage] of their possessions . . .” (Document A). Locke means every man is naturally equal, no one was created better and he has certain guaranteed rights. This helps society because it would deny a monarch to strip a person of their guaranteed rights and it would make the monarch less powerful and his/her power would be given to the people. The greatest change to government Locke states as necessary, “(W)hen the government is dissolved [ended], the people are at liberty to provide themselves, by erecting a new legislative [lawmaking body] . . . they have not only a right to get out of [a failed government] but to prevent it.” Locke said the government can be dissipated if they don’t their job and the people can enforce this by overthrowing the current government or monarch. This lets a monarch or a figure of high power know he’s expendable keeping him on track and in the best interest of the people. John Locke vouched for changes in politics yet there were other philosophes that argued for changes in areas excluding politics and the government. Many analyzed the view of society and considered what allowed a society to function harmoniously and in sync.
Voltaire, a French philosophe, observed society and its religious aspects and came to the conclusion that people should have the right to choose their religions without religious persecution. Voltaire states, “ . . . but as there are such a multitude [of religions], they all live happy and in peace.” (Document B) Voltaire explains, because there are many religions living in England, it is a direct correlation to peace and prosperity. Voltaire worked to expand religious freedoms in other countries, such as France thus providing society with more rights and freedoms. He also said, “If one religion...

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AP euro DBQ Essay

851 words - 3 pages Michael Burger 11/3/14 Period 1 Scientific Revolution DBQ During the the 16th and 17th century, scientists and astronomers in Western Europe developed controversial and revolutionary ideas about the Earth. The Scientific Revolution was an exciting era, filled with people ahead of their time making radical...

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